From A Poet’s Glossary – Couplet

From A Poet’s Glossary – Couplet

The couplet, two successive lines of poetry, usually rhymed (aa), has been an elemental stanzaic unit—a couple, a pairing—as long as there has been written rhyming poetry in English. It can stand as an epigram­matic poem on its own, a weapon for aphoristic wit, as in Pope’s “Epigram Engraved on the Collar of a Dog which I gave to his Royal Highness” (1734):

I am his Highness’ Dog at Kew;
Pray tell me Sir, whose Dog are you?

The couplet also serves as an organizing pattern in long poems (Shake­speare’s “Venus and Adonis,” 1592–1593; Marlowe’s “Hero and Leander,” 1593) or part of a larger stanzaic unit. It stands as the pithy conclusion to the ottava rima stanza (abababcc), the rhyme royal stanza (ababbcc\), and the Shakespearean sonnet (ababcdcdefefgg\).\>\>

 

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